Posts Tagged ‘pietersen’

What Now For England After Fourth Defeat In A Row?

Spin 4-0 England – Should Strauss/Flower Stick Or Twist?

It has not been the recent way with England’s cricket team to lose four games in a row. However unlucky they might feel they have been to do so, the facts are what they are. They have failed to win a Test this winter and are in danger of losing their status as the world’s best Test team.

Particularly in Sri Lanka, they have made errors of judgement at key times in the game and committed basic mistakes. If you want to beat any team at home, let alone Sri Lanka when Mahela Jayawardene is in full flow, you can’t afford to drop catches and bowl no balls that result in wicket-taking deliveries.

Even before the match had finished, Andrew Strauss was already coming under pressure in some quarters – see our interview with David Lloyd for just one example – and he isn’t alone.

Sri Lanka Celebrate As England Lose Again

Sri Lanka Celebrate As England Lose Again - REUTERS / Action Images

Only Jonathan Trott and Ian Bell held their hands up with the bat during the match but not one batsman has truly excelled this winter. Eoin Morgan made way for Samit Patel as England’s management team finally decided to play a five-bowler attack.

Given how well the bowlers (in general) performed and how poorly (again, in general terms) the batsmen performed, was that the right move? For all his improvement as a bowler and with the bat, is Monty Panesar’s fielding still holding him and the team back? You might argue a similar case for Patel but he is technically as accomplished a batsman as Ravi Bopara or Morgan, the players he finds himself in competition with.

England now need to make some important decisions ahead of the second Test. Some of the batsmen who are selected will be playing for their positions come the summer.

But is it time for sweeping changes once the team returns home, or should the players who got England to the top of the Test rankings be trusted to either keep them there or get them back there, depending on the result in Colombo?

Is it time for Strauss to stand aside and let Alastair Cook take over the ropes? Should England be looking to the next generation and players like James Taylor and Jonathan Bairstow to be putting Kevin Pietersen and Ian Bell under serious pressure?

Let us know what you think by leaving us a comment below. You can also follow us on Twitter or Facebook.

Cook Leads England’s ODI Revival – A New Dawn Or A False One?

England’s one-day cricket performances in the last week have provided a refreshing change for fans who were dismayed by the 3-0 Test series defeat to Pakistan.

Alastair Cook

England captain Alastair Cook has led by example for his side in the UAE © REUTERS / Action Images

Alastair Cook has led from the front and by becoming the first England captain to score back-to-back ODI centuries has firmly delivered another riposte – if one was needed – to lingering critics of his suitability for the limited overs side.

Steven Finn has taken consistency to a new level by twice returning figures of four for 34, Ravi Bopara has batted with a new-found maturity to score two important half-centuries and Samit Patel has been a match-changer with the ball and in the field.

Two wins do not, however, make a world-beating team, but could this series be a new dawn for England’s one-day side? Or are you still unconvinced that this team has all the options covered?

Consider that England have not beaten India, Sri Lanka or Pakistan away from home since 2007 and contrast with the way that they have outplayed Pakistan so far in the UAE. Consider that even with misfiring batsmen (Kevin Pietersen, Eoin Morgan) they have been able to set defendable totals. Consider that Tim Bresnan cannot even get into the team at the moment such is the way that Finn has grabbed his opportunity.

But how long can it last? Over the years, we have time and again proclaimed series performances as ‘new dawns’ for English cricket only for the reality to be anything but. Wins in Sri Lanka in 2007 and then over Australia in 2010 at home didn’t see the team kick on and produce the performances they needed to at the World Cup in 2011.

Perhaps we would be better served by looking at the longer term. England are building towards the next Champions Trophy (2013) and then the World Cup (2015) so the goal is to have a settled, winning team by then. A few hiccups along the way can probably be expected. But one thing is for sure – under captain Cook in the UAE – so far, so good.

What do you think – another false dawn for England’s ODI team or are England on track? Or is it simply too early to say?

 

England On The Back Foot

“I felt it was better to play him off the front foot.”

Those were the words of Nick Compton, who made 95 against Saeed Ajmal and his Worcestershire team-mates last July, when the Pakistani mystery man was turning his arm over for the Pears.

Eoin Morgan

Morgan goes back to a ball from Abdur Rehman and is bowled. Credit: Action Images / Paul Childs Livepic

Somerset racked up 591/9 before declaring and went on to win the game. Ajmal ended with five for 150 from his 51 overs.

“I stood on off-stump and looked to play very straight,” Compton added. “Ajmal’s not a big spinner of the ball and his main weapon is pace through the air, and I felt it was better to play him off the front foot. (He also used the sweep to great effect). The fact that he can skid it on and it might not bounce as much or go the other way, if you sit back I think you’re guessing and you haven’t got as much time to react.”

England might consider those words as they reflect on the wreckage of back-to-back defeats against an Ajmal-inspired Pakistan.

Granted – the pitch at New Road was a good deal flatter than those in Dubai, and particularly in Abu Dhabi. Granted – it was Abdur Rehman who caused the bulk of the damage this time around. Nevertheless the point still stands.

England were rooted on the back foot and seemed loathe to do anything that might be construed as a ‘lunge’ lest they incur the wrath of the traveling press. Gone were the days of Duncan Fletcher’s forward press, the Sky commentary team’s ’beloved’ sweep shot, or the advance down the pitch to meet the ball like a man. Instead we were greeted with the sight of one after another of England’s batsmen giving the impression of being perched on a shooting stick.

Ajmal and Rehman both bowl with relatively low arms, and, for spinners, relatively quickly. The pitches in Dubai and Abu Dhabi are not renowned for their excessive or uneven bounce. The situation cried out for sweep – even the reverse sweep. Instead the Englishmen were paralysed with fear.

When the Pakistanis batted they used the sweep, only sparingly admittedly, but they paid heed to the another of Compton’s well-reasoned points – play straight. Misbah-ul-Haq walloped Panesar over long-on on a couple of occasions, while over-pitched deliveries from both Swann and Panesar alike were drilled down the ground.

Maybe England need to re-think their method against spin. It shouldn’t be too hard. Their coach, Andy Flower, was one of the finest players of spin bowling around and I seem to remember he was rather partial to the odd sweep shot too

India-England Series Reflections – Do England Need A New Strategy?

By the time England slumped to a galling 5-0 defeat to India as they lost the final One-Day International in Kolkata by 95 runs, a sense of inevitability had been lingering for much of the tour.

Nobody was particularly surprised when they lost, or that they failed to bat through 50 overs for the fourth time in five games. Missing star players Kevin Pietersen, Eoin Morgan, James Anderson and Stuart Broad, they looked nothing like the team that looked so good when beating India 3-0 on home soil all of two months ago.

England’s record in India is abysmal and they have long struggled to deal with conditions in the subcontinent but what might the management have learned from this series and are big changes required ahead of the series against Pakistan?

Undoubtedly the return of those four players will boost England but is a change of strategy required, as has been mooted by former captain Michael Vaughan, or should England just accept that in this series, they were outplayed by the world champions who showed that while their strength in depth in Test cricket is somewhat lacking, in ODIs, their bench strength is unparalleled.

For India, there was no Sehwag, no Tendulkar, no Yuvraj, no Harbhajan Singh, no Zaheer Khan yet no real problem with defeating England.

India Too Strong For England

India celebrate, England go back to the drawing board - REUTERS / Action Images

Opening Thoughts On India-England ODI Series

Now the dust has settled on the West Indies beating Bangladesh there is just enough time before the opening Twenty20 International between South Africa and Australia to think about the start of England’s ODI series in India.

Neither team is at full strength (India are still without Tendulkar, Sehwag, Zaheer, Yuvraj; England miss Morgan and Broad while resting Anderson) and perhaps that’s something we’re going to have to get used to more and more of – teams constantly rotating their resources as the volume of cricket continues to increase.

It promises to be a fascinating series, with India rightly favoured at home but England on the crest of a wave as reigning T20 world champions, Test champions and coming off the back of a 3-0 series win over India at home.

Apparently, India aren’t talking of revenge or payback, merely of winning the series. That’s exactly what England are trying to do too. You can read Chetan Narula’s in-depth preview of the series here and I’ll be catching up with him for our latest series of England v India podcasts later today.

In the meantime, who do you think will win, and will England drop Pietersen for Bairstow?

Kevin Pietersen takes a watching brief

Kevin Pietersen takes a watching brief - REUTERS / Action Images